THE POWER, WEISE, SAMUEL, VAUGHAN GENEALOGY
SHIPS IN & AROUND VALPARAISO BETWEEN 1840-1918
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PANAMA Pacific Steam Navigation..Panama 2 built in 1866 by Randolph & Elder..into Pacific Coast Service 1866.

TABOGA was built in 1896 by Wigham Richardson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 649grt, a length of 185ft, a beam of 31ft 1in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Chiriqui she was built for the coastal service. She was seized by the Colombian Government for war duties in 1901 but released after the intervention of a British gun-boat. In 1909 she was sold to Pinel Bros. of Panama and wrecked in May 1911.

PERLITA was built in 1896 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 49grt, a length of 62ft, and a beam of 15ft 4in. She was a steam launch built for PSNC to service ships lying at anchor in the Valparaiso roadstead. With a permanent wooden awning over the stern and midships deckhouse she may have had a brass funnel instead of the customary black. Her career and subsequent disposal is not recorded.

CHILE (3) was built in 1896 by Caird & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 3225grt, a length of 350ft 4in, a beam of 43ft 1in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. One of a pair she was built for the Valparaiso - Callao service where she remained until 1921 when she was transferred to the Valparaiso - Cristobal service. In 1923 she was sold to Soc. Maritima y Comercial R. W. James y Cia of Valparaiso and renamed Flora. After a further eleven years service she was finally broken up.

PERU (3) was built in 1896 by Caird & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 3225grt, a length of 350ft 4in, a beam of 43ft 1in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. Sister of the Chile she mirrored her career until 1923 when she was sold to Soc. Anon. Gonzalez Soffia y Cia retaining her name. A large white 'S' was painted on the funnel. In 1928 she was sold to Soc. Anon. Maritima Chilena without a change of name and was eventually broken up in 1944.

CORCOVADO (2) was built in 1896 by C. S. Swan & Hunter at Newcastle with a tonnage of 4568grt, a length of 390ft, a beam of 47ft 2in and a service speed of 10.75 knots. Built for the cargo services out of the UK to most west coast South American ports these ships had the wheelhouse on the poop, reminiscent of the old sailing ships. She remained in service until 1921 when she was broken up.

SORATA (2) was built in 1897 by C. S. Swan & Hunter at Newcastle with a tonnage of 4581grt, a length of 390ft, a beam of 47ft 2in and a service speed of 10.75 knots. Sister of the Corcovado she entered service in 1897 and during the First World War was requisitioned for government duties. She was sold in 1922 to Schroder, Holken und Fischer of Hamburg and renamed Otto Fischer for use as a cargo ship only. She remained in service until 1934 when it is believed that she was broken up.

ORTONA was built in 1899 by Vickers, Sons and Maxim at Barrow with a tonnage of 7945grt, a length of 515ft, a beam of 55ft 4in and a service speed of 14 knots. A 'one off' she commenced her maiden voyage to Australia under the joint Orient - PSNC service on 24th November 1899. In June 1902 she was requisitioned as Transport No.12 for troop ship duties to South Africa during the Boer War. She returned to commercial service on the Australia run on 9th October 1903. In February 1906 she was acquired by the Royal Line with the remainder of the fleet and on 30th April 1909 made her last voyage to Australia. She was converted into a one class cruise ship with accommodation for 320 passengers in 1910 and renamed Arcadian. During the First World War she was used as a troopship and also acted as Headquarters ship to Sir Ian Hamilton. On 15th April 1917 she was torpedoed and sunk in the Eastern Mediterranean, during a voyage from Salonika to Alexandria, with the loss of 279 lives out of a total complement of 1335 persons.

COLOMBIA (2) was built in 1899 by Caird & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 3335grt, a length of 359ft 4in, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. She was built for the Pacific coast express service and remained on that route until 9th August 1907 when she was lost off Lobos de Tierra in Peru.

GUATEMALA was built in 1899 by Caird & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 3227grt, a length of 359ft 4in, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. Although the hull and engines were similar to the Colombia her finished profile differed substantially from that of her 'sister'. She was built for the South American coastal service and operated the Valparaiso - Arica - Mollendo - Callao route. She was transferred to the Valparaiso - Cristobal service in 1921 and was sold to James y Cia of Valparaiso in 1923 who renamed her Fresia. She was taken over by Soc. Anon. Maritima Chilena of Valparaiso in 1935 and finally broken up in 1914.

TALCA (2) was built in 1900 by Robert Napier & Sons at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1081grt, a length of 209ft 11in, a beam of 35ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. She started on the local Pacific coastal services in 1900 and on 12th July 1901 was wrecked off Puchoco Point in Chile.

POTOSI (2) was built in 1900 by Wigham Richardson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 5300grt, a length of 400ft 6in, a beam of 50ft and a service speed of 13 knots. Although built for the Valparaiso service, due to lack of trade, she was sold immediately on completion to the Russian Volunteer Fleet and renamed Kazan. In 1904 she was captured by the Japanese Navy Department and renamed Kasato Maru. She was acquired by Osaka Shosen K. K. in 1918 who retained her name but later amended it to Kasado Maru. In 1930 she was broken up in Japan.

GALICIA (2) was built in 1901 by Wigham Richardson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 5896grt, a length of 400ft 6in, a beam of 50ft and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Potosi she was built for the Liverpool - Valparaiso service but was completed without any passenger accommodation. On 31st July 1915 she struck a mine in the English Channel in the Downs but managed to reach port safely. Two years later, on 12th May 1917, she sank after hitting a mine off Teignmouth.

PERICO was built in 1901 by J. Jones & Sons at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 268grt, a length of 125ft 6in, a beam of 23ft 1in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was built as a replacement for Morro, the tender at Panama. By 1924 she was out of service.

PANAMA (3) was built in 1902 by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 5981grt, a length of 401ft 2in, a beam of 52ft 4in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. The first of a class of four ships she was launched on 8th March 1902 and sailed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso in the following May. With her sisters she was later transferred to the coastal service. During the First World War she was requisitioned for use as a hospital ship and November 1918 repatriated German POW's. I 1919 she repatriated wounded troops from the eastern Mediterranean and in 1920 became the Admiralty's permanent hospital ship and renamed Maine. On 24th May 1922 she took up her station ay Malta and in 1924 was based at Constantinople. Between January and November 1927 she was based on the China station. In 1935 she acted as a hotel ship for 500 Government guests at King George V's Silver Jubilee. During 1936 she was based at Alexandria for the Abyssinian War and later at Haifa when trouble blew up in Palestine. When the Spanish Civil War was being fought she steamed some 20,996 miles in the process of evacuating 6574 refugees of 41 nationalities. As the oldest hospital ship afloat she was given the number '1' when the Second World War was declared in 1939. On 6th September 1941 she was bombed at Alexandria with the loss of 4 lives. In 1945 she was based at Piraeus during the Greek Civil War. On 22nd October 1946 the Maine went to the assist the British destroyers HMS Saumarez and HMS Volage after they had struck mines laid by the Albanians in the Corfu Channel with the loss of 45 lives. During the rescue she severely grounded herself. She was finally decommissioned at Rosyth on 21st February 1947 and arrived at Barrow on 8th July 1948 where she was broken up.

VICTORIA was built in 1902 by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 5967grt, a length of 401ft 2in, a beam of 52ft 4in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Panama she was launched on 21st June 1902 and commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 5th March 1903. On arrival at Valparaiso she was immediately put on the Callao run. During the First World War she was requisitioned for government service and finally broken up in Holland in 1923.

MEXICO was built in 1902 by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 5549grt, a length of 401ft 2in, a beam of 52ft 4in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Panama she was launched on 22nd March 1902 and on 2nd July operated PSNC's first cruise to the Norwegian fjords with 114 passengers. At the end of that voyage she was transferred to the South American routes. On 23rd March 1917 she was either torpedoed or hit a mine in the bow when passing through the English Channel. Flooding was minimised by plugging the hole with cotton bales and she avoided sinking by steaming stern first to the nearest port. She was broken up in 1922.

CALIFORNIA was built in 1902 by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 5547grt, a length of 401ft 2in, a beam of 52ft 4in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Panama she was launched on the same day as the Victoria, 21st June 1902. She commenced her maiden voyage on 2nd October from Liverpool to Valparaiso whereupon she maintained the Valparaiso - Callao service. On 17th October 1917 she was torpedoed off Cape Vilano with the loss of 4 lives.

RUPANCO was built in 1895 by Howaldtswerke at Kiel with a tonnage of 818grt, a length of 182ft, a beam of 32ft and a service speed of 9 knots. She was built for Ferdinand Prehn of Keil and acquired by PSNC in 1902 to replace the lost Talca and making sailings out of Valparaiso. She sank at Valparaiso in 1914.

GALLITO was built in 1902 by J. Shearer & Son at Glasgow with a tonnage of 130grt, a length of 86ft, a beam of 19ft and a service speed of 9 knots. With a name meaning 'Little Rooster' she was a tug built for deployment in South American waters. She was sold and broken up in 1931.

ORITA (1) was built in 1903 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 9266grt, a length of 485ft 5in, a beam of 58ft and a service speed of 14 knots. She was launched on 15th November 1902 and, at the time, was the largest liner on the route. Her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Callao via Valparaiso commenced on 8th April 1903. On 10th February 1919 she undertook PSNC's second sailing from Liverpool to Valparaiso via the Panama Canal and Callao but the more profitable east coast route via Montevideo predominated. She was laid up in the United Kingdom after making her final sailing via Montevideo on 22nd September 1927 and was broken up at Morecambe in Lancashire during 1931.

CHILOE was built in 1882 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2309grt, a length of 321ft, a beam of 37ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. She joined the Pacific coastal service in 1882 and, in July, 1892, was lost at Talcahuano during a voyage from Valparaiso to Puerto Montt.

MANAVI was built in 1885 by Robert Napier & Sons at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1041grt, a length of 216ft, a beam of 35ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed in May 1885 for the Pacific coastal services she remained in service until 1920 when, it is assumed, that she was scrapped due to her age.

QUITO (4) was built in 1888 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 1089grt, a length of 216ft, a beam of 35ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Manavi she entered service in 1888. According to the records of PSNC she was sold to Royal Mail Line in 1915 but a purchase in that company is not recorded. Lloyds Register gave the owner as Etchegaray Onfray & Co. of Valparaiso. She was broken up in 1925.

OROYA (2) was built in 1886 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 6057grt, a length of 474ft, a beam of 49ft 4in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. Designed for the Australian service she was launched on 31st August 1886, was PSNC's first straight stemmed ocean liner and their largest ship at that time. She commenced her maiden voyage on 17th February 1887 from London to Melbourne and Sydney via the Suez Canal. On 4th March 1895 she went aground and was severely damaged in the Bay of Naples. She was refitted in 1905 and in February 1906 was sold to Royal Mail Line for the Orient - Royal Mail service. Renamed Oro for her final voyage she was broken up in Italy during 1909.

ORIZABA was built in 1886 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 6077grt, a length of 474ft, a beam of 49ft 4in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. Sister of the Oroya she was built for PSNC but on completion was placed under Orient Line management and deployed on the Australia run via the Suez Canal. Her maiden voyage commenced on 30th September 1886 from Southampton to Melbourne and Sydney via the Suez Canal. On 17th February 1905, whilst in dense smoke haze caused by bush fires, she ran aground and was wrecked off Garden Island, Sydney. The wreck was eventually sold for £3750.

OROTAVA was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 5857grt, a length of 430ft, a beam of 49ft 3in and a service speed of 14.5 knots. She was built for the Liverpool to Valparaiso service and made two voyages before being transferred to Orient Line management and deployment on the Australian service via the Suez Canal. She commenced her first voyage to Sydney via Suez and Melbourne on 6th June 1890.In 1896, whilst coaling at Tilbury, she capsized with the loss of 4 lives. She was raised and refurbished and resumed service to Australia in 1897. During the Boer War from 1899 to 1903 she was used as War Transport No. 91 but retaining her PSNC livery. She returned to the Australia service on 13th March 1903. In February 1906 ownership was transferred to Royal Mail Line but remained on the Australia service. On 5th March 1909 she commenced her last voyage to Australia before transferring to the West Indies routes. In 1914 she joined the "B" Line of the 10th Cruiser Squadron and in 1919 was sold and broken up.

ORUBA (1) was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 5852grt, a length of 430ft, a beam of 49ft 3in and a service speed of 14.5 knots. Sister of the Orotava she was built for the Liverpool - Valparaiso service. In the following year she was transferred to the Orient Line service and commenced her first sailing to Australia on 4th July 1890. In February 1906 she was transferred to the Royal Mail Line and continued sailings to Australia until 16th October 1908 when she made her final sailing before being transferred to Royal Mail's South American service to Buenos Aires. She was purchased by the British Admiralty in 1914 and rebuilt to represent the battleship HMS Orion. In 1915 she was scuttled at Mudros Harbour in the Agean Sea to act as a breakwater.

SANTIAGO (4) was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 2953grt, a length of 350ft, a beam of 45ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built for the coastal Valparaiso - Callao service where she remained until 18th June 1907 when she was lost near Corral.

AREQUIPA (2) was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 2953grt, a length of 350ft, a beam of 45ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built for the Valparaiso - Callao coastal service. On 2nd June 1903, while handling cargo at the Valparaiso buoys, she was caught by a sudden 'Northerner' gale. Although the crew and shore staff fought to hold the ship she suddenly keeled over and sank during an intensely violent series of gusts with the loss of over 80 lives.

ASSISTANCE was built in 1891 by Gourlay Bros. & Co. at Dundee with a tonnage of 214grt, a length of 105ft, and a beam of 22ft 7in. She was a tug built initially for service at Liverpool and later in Chile. In 1926 she was sold to Oelckers Hermanos of Chile and renamed Tautil. She was wrecked near Lota in July 1929.

MAGELLAN (2) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3590grt, a length of 360ft 7in, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was one of four cargo ships built for the UK - west coast of South America services. With a cargo capacity of 234,000 cubic feet she also had accommodation for 12 Second Class passengers. On 25th July 1918 she was torpedoed and sunk 53 miles north east of Cape Serrat with the loss of 1life.

INCA (2) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3593grt, a length of 360ft 7in, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Magellan she was built for the cargo services to South America. She was sold to Soc. Anon y Comercial Braun y Blanchard of Punta Arenas, Argentine in 1923 and renamed Llanquihue. After a further six years service she was broken up in 1929.

SARMIENTO (1) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3603grt, a length of 361ft, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Magellan she was the third cargo ship built for the UK - west coast of South America service. In 1910 she was sold to Messageries Maritimes of Marseilles and renamed Normand. She was used to establish a UK - French channel ports - Black Sea service for the French Government and was eventually broken up in 1923.

ANTISANA was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3584grt, a length of 361ft, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Magellan she was built for the South American cargo services. In 1910 she was sold to Messageries Maritimes of Marseilles who renamed her Basque and operated her on the same service as the Normand. At 11.00hrs on 18th February 1918 she was torpedoed by UB-52at Marsa Sirocco. A fire broke out on board and the second engineer Achille Vidal was burnt to death attempting to quell the flames, an heroic act for which he was posthumously awarded the Legion d'Honneur. The ship was eventually beached at Malta on 20th February. In December 1920 she resumed service to the Black Sea and was finally broken up in Italy during November 1923.

ORELLANA was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 4821grt, a length of 401ft, a beam of 47ft 7in and a service speed of 11 knots. Launched on 7th December 1892 she was built mainly for cargo services but had accommodation for up to 675 emigrants which were carried seasonally from Spain and Portugal. In 1904 she was sold to the Hamburg America Line and renamed Allemania. Two years later she was sold to the Russian Government as a replacement for ships lost during Russo - Japanese war and renamed Kowno. In 1907 she returned to Hamburg America Line ownership and reverted to her former name, Allemania. In April 1917 she was seized by the United States, operated by the United States Shipping Board and renamed Owasco. On 10th December 1917 she was torpedoed by a German submarine off Alicante in Spain, was beached and being beyond commercial repair was broken up in the following year.

ORCANA (1) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 4803grt, a length of 401ft, a beam of 47ft 7in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Orellana she commenced her maiden voyage on 19th July 1893 undertaking similar cargo and emigrant duties. During the Boer War (1899 - 1903) she became Transport No. 40 and operated as a hospital ship with a yellow funnel and a white hull. In 1904 she was sold to the Hamburg America Line and renamed Albingia. She was transferred to the Russian Government for collier duties in 1906 and renamed Grodno. Under the Treaty of Portsmouth, USA, 29th August 1905 and as the war was over she was returned to the Hamburg America Line in 1907 as the Albingia. In April 1917 she was seized by the United States, operated by the United States Shipping Board and renamed Argonaut. On 5th June 1918 she was sunk by U-82 off Bishop Rock.

ORISSA was built in 1895 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 5317grt, a length of 421ft, a beam of 48ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Launched on the 15th December 1894 she commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 11th April 1895. During the Boer War she became War Transport No.18 and at the end of the war carried Lord Kitchener, Sir John French and Sir Ian Hamilton from Cape Town to the UK. In August 1906 she was berthed at Valparaiso during the earthquake and acted as a refugee accommodation ship. On 25th June 1918 she was torpedoed and sunk 21 miles southwest of Skerryvore with the loss of 6 lives.

OROPESA (1) was built in 1895 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 5303grt, a length of 421ft, a beam of 48ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Sister of the Orissa she was launched on 29th November 1894 and commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso under the command of Capt. Hayes on 28th February 1895. In November 1914 she was requisitioned and converted into an Armed Merchant Cruiser for deployment within the 10th Cruiser Squadron under the command of Capt. Percy Brown. She sank a U-boat off Skerryvore in Scotland during March 1915. In December 1915 she was transferred to the French Navy but operated by her British crew and renamed Champagne. On 15th October 1917 she was torpedoed and sunk in the Irish Sea with the loss of 56 lives.

ORAVIA was built in 1897 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 5321grt, a length of 421ft, a beam of 48ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Sister of the Orissa she was launched on 5th December 1896 and commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 1st July 1897. On 12th November 1912 ,during an occasional call at the Falkland Islands whilst on a voyage from Liverpool to Callao, she ran aground on Billy Rock, Seal Rocks, Port Stanley and was abandoned four days later.

CHIRIQUI was built in 1896 by Wigham Richardson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 643grt, a length of 185ft, a beam of 31ft 1in and a service speed of 11 knots. Built for the coastal services she remained with the company until 1910 when she was sunk by and explosion.

CHILOE was built in 1882 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2309grt, a length of 321ft, a beam of 37ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. She joined the Pacific coastal service in 1882 and, in July, 1892, was lost at Talcahuano during a voyage from Valparaiso to Puerto Montt.

MANAVI was built in 1885 by Robert Napier & Sons at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1041grt, a length of 216ft, a beam of 35ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed in May 1885 for the Pacific coastal services she remained in service until 1920 when, it is assumed, that she was scrapped due to her age.

QUITO (4) was built in 1888 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 1089grt, a length of 216ft, a beam of 35ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Manavi she entered service in 1888. According to the records of PSNC she was sold to Royal Mail Line in 1915 but a purchase in that company is not recorded. Lloyds Register gave the owner as Etchegaray Onfray & Co. of Valparaiso. She was broken up in 1925.

OROYA (2) was built in 1886 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 6057grt, a length of 474ft, a beam of 49ft 4in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. Designed for the Australian service she was launched on 31st August 1886, was PSNC's first straight stemmed ocean liner and their largest ship at that time. She commenced her maiden voyage on 17th February 1887 from London to Melbourne and Sydney via the Suez Canal. On 4th March 1895 she went aground and was severely damaged in the Bay of Naples. She was refitted in 1905 and in February 1906 was sold to Royal Mail Line for the Orient - Royal Mail service. Renamed Oro for her final voyage she was broken up in Italy during 1909.

ORIZABA was built in 1886 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 6077grt, a length of 474ft, a beam of 49ft 4in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. Sister of the Oroya she was built for PSNC but on completion was placed under Orient Line management and deployed on the Australia run via the Suez Canal. Her maiden voyage commenced on 30th September 1886 from Southampton to Melbourne and Sydney via the Suez Canal. On 17th February 1905, whilst in dense smoke haze caused by bush fires, she ran aground and was wrecked off Garden Island, Sydney. The wreck was eventually sold for £3750.

OROTAVA was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 5857grt, a length of 430ft, a beam of 49ft 3in and a service speed of 14.5 knots. She was built for the Liverpool to Valparaiso service and made two voyages before being transferred to Orient Line management and deployment on the Australian service via the Suez Canal. She commenced her first voyage to Sydney via Suez and Melbourne on 6th June 1890.In 1896, whilst coaling at Tilbury, she capsized with the loss of 4 lives. She was raised and refurbished and resumed service to Australia in 1897. During the Boer War from 1899 to 1903 she was used as War Transport No. 91 but retaining her PSNC livery. She returned to the Australia service on 13th March 1903. In February 1906 ownership was transferred to Royal Mail Line but remained on the Australia service. On 5th March 1909 she commenced her last voyage to Australia before transferring to the West Indies routes. In 1914 she joined the "B" Line of the 10th Cruiser Squadron and in 1919 was sold and broken up.

ORUBA (1) was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 5852grt, a length of 430ft, a beam of 49ft 3in and a service speed of 14.5 knots. Sister of the Orotava she was built for the Liverpool - Valparaiso service. In the following year she was transferred to the Orient Line service and commenced her first sailing to Australia on 4th July 1890. In February 1906 she was transferred to the Royal Mail Line and continued sailings to Australia until 16th October 1908 when she made her final sailing before being transferred to Royal Mail's South American service to Buenos Aires. She was purchased by the British Admiralty in 1914 and rebuilt to represent the battleship HMS Orion. In 1915 she was scuttled at Mudros Harbour in the Agean Sea to act as a breakwater.

SANTIAGO (4) was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 2953grt, a length of 350ft, a beam of 45ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built for the coastal Valparaiso - Callao service where she remained until 18th June 1907 when she was lost near Corral.

AREQUIPA (2) was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 2953grt, a length of 350ft, a beam of 45ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built for the Valparaiso - Callao coastal service. On 2nd June 1903, while handling cargo at the Valparaiso buoys, she was caught by a sudden 'Northerner' gale. Although the crew and shore staff fought to hold the ship she suddenly keeled over and sank during an intensely violent series of gusts with the loss of over 80 lives.

ASSISTANCE was built in 1891 by Gourlay Bros. & Co. at Dundee with a tonnage of 214grt, a length of 105ft, and a beam of 22ft 7in. She was a tug built initially for service at Liverpool and later in Chile. In 1926 she was sold to Oelckers Hermanos of Chile and renamed Tautil. She was wrecked near Lota in July 1929.

MAGELLAN (2) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3590grt, a length of 360ft 7in, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was one of four cargo ships built for the UK - west coast of South America services. With a cargo capacity of 234,000 cubic feet she also had accommodation for 12 Second Class passengers. On 25th July 1918 she was torpedoed and sunk 53 miles north east of Cape Serrat with the loss of 1 life.

INCA (2) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3593grt, a length of 360ft 7in, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Magellan she was built for the cargo services to South America. She was sold to Soc. Anon y Comercial Braun y Blanchard of Punta Arenas, Argentine in 1923 and renamed Llanquihue. After a further six years service she was broken up in 1929.

SARMIENTO (1) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3603grt, a length of 361ft, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Magellan she was the third cargo ship built for the UK - west coast of South America service. In 1910 she was sold to Messageries Maritimes of Marseilles and renamed Normand. She was used to establish a UK - French channel ports - Black Sea service for the French Government and was eventually broken up in 1923.

ANTISANA was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3584grt, a length of 361ft, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Magellan she was built for the South American cargo services. In 1910 she was sold to Messageries Maritimes of Marseilles who renamed her Basque and operated her on the same service as the Normand. At 11.00hrs on 18th February 1918 she was torpedoed by UB-52at Marsa Sirocco. A fire broke out on board and the second engineer Achille Vidal was burnt to death attempting to quell the flames, an heroic act for which he was posthumously awarded the Legion d'Honneur. The ship was eventually beached at Malta on 20th February. In December 1920 she resumed service to the Black Sea and was finally broken up in Italy during November 1923.

ORELLANA was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 4821grt, a length of 401ft, a beam of 47ft 7in and a service speed of 11 knots. Launched on 7th December 1892 she was built mainly for cargo services but had accommodation for up to 675 emigrants which were carried seasonally from Spain and Portugal. In 1904 she was sold to the Hamburg America Line and renamed Allemania. Two years later she was sold to the Russian Government as a replacement for ships lost during Russo - Japanese war and renamed Kowno. In 1907 she returned to Hamburg America Line ownership and reverted to her former name, Allemania. In April 1917 she was seized by the United States, operated by the United States Shipping Board and renamed Owasco. On 10th December 1917 she was torpedoed by a German submarine off Alicante in Spain, was beached and being beyond commercial repair was broken up in the following year.

ORCANA (1) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 4803grt, a length of 401ft, a beam of 47ft 7in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Orellana she commenced her maiden voyage on 19th July 1893 undertaking similar cargo and emigrant duties. During the Boer War (1899 - 1903) she became Transport No. 40 and operated as a hospital ship with a yellow funnel and a white hull. In 1904 she was sold to the Hamburg America Line and renamed Albingia. She was transferred to the Russian Government for collier duties in 1906 and renamed Grodno. Under the Treaty of Portsmouth, USA, 29th August 1905 and as the war was over she was returned to the Hamburg America Line in 1907 as the Albingia. In April 1917 she was seized by the United States, operated by the United States Shipping Board and renamed Argonaut. On 5th June 1918 she was sunk by U-82 off Bishop Rock.

ORISSA was built in 1895 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 5317grt, a length of 421ft, a beam of 48ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Launched on the 15th December 1894 she commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 11th April 1895. During the Boer War she became War Transport No.18 and at the end of the war carried Lord Kitchener, Sir John French and Sir Ian Hamilton from Cape Town to the UK. In August 1906 she was berthed at Valparaiso during the earthquake and acted as a refugee accommodation ship. On 25th June 1918 she was torpedoed and sunk 21 miles southwest of Skerryvore with the loss of 6 lives.

OROPESA (1) was built in 1895 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 5303grt, a length of 421ft, a beam of 48ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Sister of the Orissa she was launched on 29th November 1894 and commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso under the command of Capt. Hayes on 28th February 1895. In November 1914 she was requisitioned and converted into an Armed Merchant Cruiser for deployment within the 10th Cruiser Squadron under the command of Capt. Percy Brown. She sank a U-boat off Skerryvore in Scotland during March 1915. In December 1915 she was transferred to the French Navy but operated by her British crew and renamed Champagne. On 15th October 1917 she was torpedoed and sunk in the Irish Sea with the loss of 56 lives.

ORAVIA was built in 1897 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 5321grt, a length of 421ft, a beam of 48ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Sister of the Orissa she was launched on 5th December 1896 and commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 1st July 1897. On 12th November 1912 ,during an occasional call at the Falkland Islands whilst on a voyage from Liverpool to Callao, she ran aground on Billy Rock, Seal Rocks, Port Stanley and was abandoned four days later.

CHIRIQUI was built in 1896 by Wigham Richardson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 643grt, a length of 185ft, a beam of 31ft 1in and a service speed of 11 knots. Built for the coastal services she remained with the company until 1910 when she was sunk by and explosion.

CHILOE was built in 1882 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2309grt, a length of 321ft, a beam of 37ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. She joined the Pacific coastal service in 1882 and, in July, 1892, was lost at Talcahuano during a voyage from Valparaiso to Puerto Montt.

MANAVI was built in 1885 by Robert Napier & Sons at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1041grt, a length of 216ft, a beam of 35ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed in May 1885 for the Pacific coastal services she remained in service until 1920 when, it is assumed, that she was scrapped due to her age.

QUITO (4) was built in 1888 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 1089grt, a length of 216ft, a beam of 35ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Manavi she entered service in 1888. According to the records of PSNC she was sold to Royal Mail Line in 1915 but a purchase in that company is not recorded. Lloyds Register gave the owner as Etchegaray Onfray & Co. of Valparaiso. She was broken up in 1925.

OROYA (2) was built in 1886 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 6057grt, a length of 474ft, a beam of 49ft 4in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. Designed for the Australian service she was launched on 31st August 1886, was PSNC's first straight stemmed ocean liner and their largest ship at that time. She commenced her maiden voyage on 17th February 1887 from London to Melbourne and Sydney via the Suez Canal. On 4th March 1895 she went aground and was severely damaged in the Bay of Naples. She was refitted in 1905 and in February 1906 was sold to Royal Mail Line for the Orient - Royal Mail service. Renamed Oro for her final voyage she was broken up in Italy during 1909.

ORIZABA was built in 1886 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 6077grt, a length of 474ft, a beam of 49ft 4in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. Sister of the Oroya she was built for PSNC but on completion was placed under Orient Line management and deployed on the Australia run via the Suez Canal. Her maiden voyage commenced on 30th September 1886 from Southampton to Melbourne and Sydney via the Suez Canal. On 17th February 1905, whilst in dense smoke haze caused by bush fires, she ran aground and was wrecked off Garden Island, Sydney. The wreck was eventually sold for £3750.

OROTAVA was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 5857grt, a length of 430ft, a beam of 49ft 3in and a service speed of 14.5 knots. She was built for the Liverpool to Valparaiso service and made two voyages before being transferred to Orient Line management and deployment on the Australian service via the Suez Canal. She commenced her first voyage to Sydney via Suez and Melbourne on 6th June 1890.In 1896, whilst coaling at Tilbury, she capsized with the loss of 4 lives. She was raised and refurbished and resumed service to Australia in 1897. During the Boer War from 1899 to 1903 she was used as War Transport No. 91 but retaining her PSNC livery. She returned to the Australia service on 13th March 1903. In February 1906 ownership was transferred to Royal Mail Line but remained on the Australia service. On 5th March 1909 she commenced her last voyage to Australia before transferring to the West Indies routes. In 1914 she joined the "B" Line of the 10th Cruiser Squadron and in 1919 was sold and broken up.

ORUBA (1) was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 5852grt, a length of 430ft, a beam of 49ft 3in and a service speed of 14.5 knots. Sister of the Orotava she was built for the Liverpool - Valparaiso service. In the following year she was transferred to the Orient Line service and commenced her first sailing to Australia on 4th July 1890. In February 1906 she was transferred to the Royal Mail Line and continued sailings to Australia until 16th October 1908 when she made her final sailing before being transferred to Royal Mail's South American service to Buenos Aires. She was purchased by the British Admiralty in 1914 and rebuilt to represent the battleship HMS Orion. In 1915 she was scuttled at Mudros Harbour in the Agean Sea to act as a breakwater.

SANTIAGO (4) was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 2953grt, a length of 350ft, a beam of 45ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built for the coastal Valparaiso - Callao service where she remained until 18th June 1907 when she was lost near Corral.

AREQUIPA (2) was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 2953grt, a length of 350ft, a beam of 45ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built for the Valparaiso - Callao coastal service. On 2nd June 1903, while handling cargo at the Valparaiso buoys, she was caught by a sudden 'Northerner' gale. Although the crew and shore staff fought to hold the ship she suddenly keeled over and sank during an intensely violent series of gusts with the loss of over 80 lives.

ASSISTANCE was built in 1891 by Gourlay Bros. & Co. at Dundee with a tonnage of 214grt, a length of 105ft, and a beam of 22ft 7in. She was a tug built initially for service at Liverpool and later in Chile. In 1926 she was sold to Oelckers Hermanos of Chile and renamed Tautil. She was wrecked near Lota in July 1929.

MAGELLAN (2) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3590grt, a length of 360ft 7in, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was one of four cargo ships built for the UK - west coast of South America services. With a cargo capacity of 234,000 cubic feet she also had accommodation for 12 Second Class passengers. On 25th July 1918 she was torpedoed and sunk 53 miles north east of Cape Serrat with the loss of 1life.

INCA (2) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3593grt, a length of 360ft 7in, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Magellan she was built for the cargo services to South America. She was sold to Soc. Anon y Comercial Braun y Blanchard of Punta Arenas, Argentine in 1923 and renamed Llanquihue. After a further six years service she was broken up in 1929.

SARMIENTO (1) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3603grt, a length of 361ft, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Magellan she was the third cargo ship built for the UK - west coast of South America service. In 1910 she was sold to Messageries Maritimes of Marseilles and renamed Normand. She was used to establish a UK - French channel ports - Black Sea service for the French Government and was eventually broken up in 1923.

ANTISANA was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3584grt, a length of 361ft, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Magellan she was built for the South American cargo services. In 1910 she was sold to Messageries Maritimes of Marseilles who renamed her Basque and operated her on the same service as the Normand. At 11.00hrs on 18th February 1918 she was torpedoed by UB-52at Marsa Sirocco. A fire broke out on board and the second engineer Achille Vidal was burnt to death attempting to quell the flames, an heroic act for which he was posthumously awarded the Legion d'Honneur. The ship was eventually beached at Malta on 20th February. In December 1920 she resumed service to the Black Sea and was finally broken up in Italy during November 1923.

ORELLANA was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 4821grt, a length of 401ft, a beam of 47ft 7in and a service speed of 11 knots. Launched on 7th December 1892 she was built mainly for cargo services but had accommodation for up to 675 emigrants which were carried seasonally from Spain and Portugal. In 1904 she was sold to the Hamburg America Line and renamed Allemania. Two years later she was sold to the Russian Government as a replacement for ships lost during Russo - Japanese war and renamed Kowno. In 1907 she returned to Hamburg America Line ownership and reverted to her former name, Allemania. In April 1917 she was seized by the United States, operated by the United States Shipping Board and renamed Owasco. On 10th December 1917 she was torpedoed by a German submarine off Alicante in Spain, was beached and being beyond commercial repair was broken up in the following year.

ORCANA (1) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 4803grt, a length of 401ft, a beam of 47ft 7in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Orellana she commenced her maiden voyage on 19th July 1893 undertaking similar cargo and emigrant duties. During the Boer War (1899 - 1903) she became Transport No. 40 and operated as a hospital ship with a yellow funnel and a white hull. In 1904 she was sold to the Hamburg America Line and renamed Albingia. She was transferred to the Russian Government for collier duties in 1906 and renamed Grodno. Under the Treaty of Portsmouth, USA, 29th August 1905 and as the war was over she was returned to the Hamburg America Line in 1907 as the Albingia. In April 1917 she was seized by the United States, operated by the United States Shipping Board and renamed Argonaut. On 5th June 1918 she was sunk by U-82 off Bishop Rock.

ORISSA was built in 1895 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 5317grt, a length of 421ft, a beam of 48ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Launched on the 15th December 1894 she commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 11th April 1895. During the Boer War she became War Transport No.18 and at the end of the war carried Lord Kitchener, Sir John French and Sir Ian Hamilton from Cape Town to the UK. In August 1906 she was berthed at Valparaiso during the earthquake and acted as a refugee accommodation ship. On 25th June 1918 she was torpedoed and sunk 21 miles southwest of Skerryvore with the loss of 6 lives.

OROPESA (1) was built in 1895 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 5303grt, a length of 421ft, a beam of 48ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Sister of the Orissa she was launched on 29th November 1894 and commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso under the command of Capt. Hayes on 28th February 1895. In November 1914 she was requisitioned and converted into an Armed Merchant Cruiser for deployment within the 10th Cruiser Squadron under the command of Capt. Percy Brown. She sank a U-boat off Skerryvore in Scotland during March 1915. In December 1915 she was transferred to the French Navy but operated by her British crew and renamed Champagne. On 15th October 1917 she was torpedoed and sunk in the Irish Sea with the loss of 56 lives.

ORAVIA was built in 1897 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 5321grt, a length of 421ft, a beam of 48ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Sister of the Orissa she was launched on 5th December 1896 and commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 1st July 1897. On 12th November 1912 ,during an occasional call at the Falkland Islands whilst on a voyage from Liverpool to Callao, she ran aground on Billy Rock, Seal Rocks, Port Stanley and was abandoned four days later.

CHIRIQUI was built in 1896 by Wigham Richardson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 643grt, a length of 185ft, a beam of 31ft 1in and a service speed of 11 knots. Built for the coastal services she remained with the company until 1910 when she was sunk by and explosion.

CHILOE was built in 1882 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2309grt, a length of 321ft, a beam of 37ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. She joined the Pacific coastal service in 1882 and, in July, 1892, was lost at Talcahuano during a voyage from Valparaiso to Puerto Montt.

MANAVI was built in 1885 by Robert Napier & Sons at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1041grt, a length of 216ft, a beam of 35ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed in May 1885 for the Pacific coastal services she remained in service until 1920 when, it is assumed, that she was scrapped due to her age.

QUITO (4) was built in 1888 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 1089grt, a length of 216ft, a beam of 35ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Manavi she entered service in 1888. According to the records of PSNC she was sold to Royal Mail Line in 1915 but a purchase in that company is not recorded. Lloyds Register gave the owner as Etchegaray Onfray & Co. of Valparaiso. She was broken up in 1925.

OROYA (2) was built in 1886 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 6057grt, a length of 474ft, a beam of 49ft 4in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. Designed for the Australian service she was launched on 31st August 1886, was PSNC's first straight stemmed ocean liner and their largest ship at that time. She commenced her maiden voyage on 17th February 1887 from London to Melbourne and Sydney via the Suez Canal. On 4th March 1895 she went aground and was severely damaged in the Bay of Naples. She was refitted in 1905 and in February 1906 was sold to Royal Mail Line for the Orient - Royal Mail service. Renamed Oro for her final voyage she was broken up in Italy during 1909.

ORIZABA was built in 1886 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 6077grt, a length of 474ft, a beam of 49ft 4in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. Sister of the Oroya she was built for PSNC but on completion was placed under Orient Line management and deployed on the Australia run via the Suez Canal. Her maiden voyage commenced on 30th September 1886 from Southampton to Melbourne and Sydney via the Suez Canal. On 17th February 1905, whilst in dense smoke haze caused by bush fires, she ran aground and was wrecked off Garden Island, Sydney. The wreck was eventually sold for £3750.

OROTAVA was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 5857grt, a length of 430ft, a beam of 49ft 3in and a service speed of 14.5 knots. She was built for the Liverpool to Valparaiso service and made two voyages before being transferred to Orient Line management and deployment on the Australian service via the Suez Canal. She commenced her first voyage to Sydney via Suez and Melbourne on 6th June 1890.In 1896, whilst coaling at Tilbury, she capsized with the loss of 4 lives. She was raised and refurbished and resumed service to Australia in 1897. During the Boer War from 1899 to 1903 she was used as War Transport No. 91 but retaining her PSNC livery. She returned to the Australia service on 13th March 1903. In February 1906 ownership was transferred to Royal Mail Line but remained on the Australia service. On 5th March 1909 she commenced her last voyage to Australia before transferring to the West Indies routes. In 1914 she joined the "B" Line of the 10th Cruiser Squadron and in 1919 was sold and broken up.

ORUBA (1) was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 5852grt, a length of 430ft, a beam of 49ft 3in and a service speed of 14.5 knots. Sister of the Orotava she was built for the Liverpool - Valparaiso service. In the following year she was transferred to the Orient Line service and commenced her first sailing to Australia on 4th July 1890. In February 1906 she was transferred to the Royal Mail Line and continued sailings to Australia until 16th October 1908 when she made her final sailing before being transferred to Royal Mail's South American service to Buenos Aires. She was purchased by the British Admiralty in 1914 and rebuilt to represent the battleship HMS Orion. In 1915 she was scuttled at Mudros Harbour in the Agean Sea to act as a breakwater.

SANTIAGO (4) was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 2953grt, a length of 350ft, a beam of 45ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built for the coastal Valparaiso - Callao service where she remained until 18th June 1907 when she was lost near Corral.

AREQUIPA (2) was built in 1889 by Barrow Shipbuilding Co. at Barrow with a tonnage of 2953grt, a length of 350ft, a beam of 45ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built for the Valparaiso - Callao coastal service. On 2nd June 1903, while handling cargo at the Valparaiso buoys, she was caught by a sudden 'Northerner' gale. Although the crew and shore staff fought to hold the ship she suddenly keeled over and sank during an intensely violent series of gusts with the loss of over 80 lives.

ASSISTANCE was built in 1891 by Gourlay Bros. & Co. at Dundee with a tonnage of 214grt, a length of 105ft, and a beam of 22ft 7in. She was a tug built initially for service at Liverpool and later in Chile. In 1926 she was sold to Oelckers Hermanos of Chile and renamed Tautil. She was wrecked near Lota in July 1929.

MAGELLAN (2) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3590grt, a length of 360ft 7in, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was one of four cargo ships built for the UK - west coast of South America services. With a cargo capacity of 234,000 cubic feet she also had accommodation for 12 Second Class passengers. On 25th July 1918 she was torpedoed and sunk 53 miles north east of Cape Serrat with the loss of 1life.

INCA (2) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3593grt, a length of 360ft 7in, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Magellan she was built for the cargo services to South America. She was sold to Soc. Anon y Comercial Braun y Blanchard of Punta Arenas, Argentine in 1923 and renamed Llanquihue. After a further six years service she was broken up in 1929.

SARMIENTO (1) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3603grt, a length of 361ft, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Magellan she was the third cargo ship built for the UK - west coast of South America service. In 1910 she was sold to Messageries Maritimes of Marseilles and renamed Normand. She was used to establish a UK - French channel ports - Black Sea service for the French Government and was eventually broken up in 1923.

ANTISANA was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 3584grt, a length of 361ft, a beam of 43ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Magellan she was built for the South American cargo services. In 1910 she was sold to Messageries Maritimes of Marseilles who renamed her Basque and operated her on the same service as the Normand. At 11.00hrs on 18th February 1918 she was torpedoed by UB-52at Marsa Sirocco. A fire broke out on board and the second engineer Achille Vidal was burnt to death attempting to quell the flames, an heroic act for which he was posthumously awarded the Legion d'Honneur. The ship was eventually beached at Malta on 20th February. In December 1920 she resumed service to the Black Sea and was finally broken up in Italy during November 1923.

ORELLANA was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 4821grt, a length of 401ft, a beam of 47ft 7in and a service speed of 11 knots. Launched on 7th December 1892 she was built mainly for cargo services but had accommodation for up to 675 emigrants which were carried seasonally from Spain and Portugal. In 1904 she was sold to the Hamburg America Line and renamed Allemania. Two years later she was sold to the Russian Government as a replacement for ships lost during Russo - Japanese war and renamed Kowno. In 1907 she returned to Hamburg America Line ownership and reverted to her former name, Allemania. In April 1917 she was seized by the United States, operated by the United States Shipping Board and renamed Owasco. On 10th December 1917 she was torpedoed by a German submarine off Alicante in Spain, was beached and being beyond commercial repair was broken up in the following year.

ORCANA (1) was built in 1893 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 4803grt, a length of 401ft, a beam of 47ft 7in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Orellana she commenced her maiden voyage on 19th July 1893 undertaking similar cargo and emigrant duties. During the Boer War (1899 - 1903) she became Transport No. 40 and operated as a hospital ship with a yellow funnel and a white hull. In 1904 she was sold to the Hamburg America Line and renamed Albingia. She was transferred to the Russian Government for collier duties in 1906 and renamed Grodno. Under the Treaty of Portsmouth, USA, 29th August 1905 and as the war was over she was returned to the Hamburg America Line in 1907 as the Albingia. In April 1917 she was seized by the United States, operated by the United States Shipping Board and renamed Argonaut. On 5th June 1918 she was sunk by U-82 off Bishop Rock.

ORISSA was built in 1895 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 5317grt, a length of 421ft, a beam of 48ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Launched on the 15th December 1894 she commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 11th April 1895. During the Boer War she became War Transport No.18 and at the end of the war carried Lord Kitchener, Sir John French and Sir Ian Hamilton from Cape Town to the UK. In August 1906 she was berthed at Valparaiso during the earthquake and acted as a refugee accommodation ship. On 25th June 1918 she was torpedoed and sunk 21 miles southwest of Skerryvore with the loss of 6 lives.

OROPESA (1) was built in 1895 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 5303grt, a length of 421ft, a beam of 48ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Sister of the Orissa she was launched on 29th November 1894 and commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso under the command of Capt. Hayes on 28th February 1895. In November 1914 she was requisitioned and converted into an Armed Merchant Cruiser for deployment within the 10th Cruiser Squadron under the command of Capt. Percy Brown. She sank a U-boat off Skerryvore in Scotland during March 1915. In December 1915 she was transferred to the French Navy but operated by her British crew and renamed Champagne. On 15th October 1917 she was torpedoed and sunk in the Irish Sea with the loss of 56 lives.

ORAVIA was built in 1897 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast with a tonnage of 5321grt, a length of 421ft, a beam of 48ft 9in and a service speed of 15 knots. Sister of the Orissa she was launched on 5th December 1896 and commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 1st July 1897. On 12th November 1912 ,during an occasional call at the Falkland Islands whilst on a voyage from Liverpool to Callao, she ran aground on Billy Rock, Seal Rocks, Port Stanley and was abandoned four days later.

CHIRIQUI was built in 1896 by Wigham Richardson & Co. at Newcastle with a tonnage of 643grt, a length of 185ft, a beam of 31ft 1in and a service speed of 11 knots. Built for the coastal services she remained with the company until 1910 when she was sunk by and explosion.

OROYA (1) was built in 1873 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1577grt, a length of 270ft 11in, a beam of 25ft 6in and a service speed of 12 knots. One of two ships built at a cost of £4,875 for the Pacific coastal service. Her subsequent career and disposal is not recorded.

ISLAY was built in 1873 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1588grt, a length of 271ft, a beam of 25ft 6in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Oroya she was the last paddle steamer built for PSNC's Pacific coastal services and delivered on 27th April 1873. In 1881 she carried rifles from Panama to Peru during the war between Chile and Peru during and was captured by Chilean warships. Although the Islay was released her master, Captain Petrice, was sacked. She was converted into a hulk in 1883.

TACNA was built in 1873 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 612grt, a length of 219ft, a beam of 26ft and a service speed of 11 knots. She was delivered for the Pacific coastal services in 1873. On 7th March 1874 she sailed from Valparaiso bound for Port de Azucar with a full cargo and with 10 head of cattle and 250 bales of hay on deck. When the wind increased suddenly the ship listed sharply and an explosion blew out the deck causing the ship to sink with the loss of 19 lives. Her master, Captain Hyde, was imprisoned by the Chileans but later released following a protest from the British.

AMAZONAS was built in 1874 by J Reid & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2019grt, a length of 301ft 8in, a beam of 38ft 11in and a service speed of 11 knots. She was built for Compania Sud Americana der Vapores of Valparaiso and acquired by PSNC in 1877. In 1879 she was repurchased by Chilean decree for trooping duties during the Peruvian war. Two years later, having been replaced by PSNC, she was sold back to Sud Americana and by 1886 she was no longer in Lloyds Register.

LONTUE was built in 1873 by J Reid & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1648grt, a length of 299ft, a beam of 40ft 11in and a service speed of 11 knots. She was built for Compania Sud Americana der Vapores of Valparaiso and acquired by PSNC in 1877. In 1879 she was chartered to the Chilean Government for use as a coastal supply vessel but on condition that she wasn't used in the war. Two years later, having been replaced by PSNC, she was sold back to Sud Americana. In 1888 she reverted to PSNC under the Chilean flag and was converted into a hulk at a later date.

LOBO was built in 1874 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 106grt, a length of 89ft 7in, and a beam of 18ft 4in. Built as a water launch for service at Callao at a cost of £4,950 her subsequent career is not recorded.

CASMA (2) was built in 1878 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 592grt, a length of 180ft 5in, a beam of 30ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Completed in November 1878 she was the company's first steel hulled ship and built for the coastal trade. In 1899 she was sold to J. J. McAuliffe & Co. of Valparaiso and based at Coquimbo with the same name. She was sold to the Costa Rican Government in the following year and broken up in 1910.
CHALA was built in 1878 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 598grt, a length of 180ft 5in, a beam of 30ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Casma she was built for the west coast service and converted into a hulk for 1897.

ARAUCO was built in 1879 by Gourlay Bros. at Dundee with a tonnage of 801grt, a length of 200ft, a beam of 29ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built for the South American services and completed in April 1879. She was sold to J. J. McAuliffe & Co. of Valparaiso who supposedly renamed her Almirante Latorre although Lloyds listed her as the Arauco until 1909 when she was out of service.

PUCHOCO was built in 1879 by Gourlay Bros. at Dundee with a tonnage of 804grt, a length of 200ft, a beam of 29ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Arauco she entered service in 1879. She was sold to J. J. McAuliffe & Co. of Valparaiso in 1899 and renamed Isidora. In the following year she was transferred to Cia Esplotadora de Lota y Coronel of Valparaiso and in 1906 was wrecked.

MENDOZA was built in 1879 by Robert Napier & Sons at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2160grt, a length of 320ft, a beam of 40ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. She was the first British ship to use electricity from a Gramme generator following experiments in HMS Minotaur. Built for the South American coastal service on the Valparaiso - Callao route and was converted into a hulk in 1904.

PIZARRO was built in 1879 by Robert Napier & Sons at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2160grt, a length of 320ft, a beam of 40ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Mendoza she joined the coastal passenger service in 1879 and was converted into a hulk in 1907.

PUNO (2) was built in 1881 by Robert Napier & Sons at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2398grt, a length of 320ft, a beam of 40ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Mendoza she joined the coastal passenger service in 1881 and was converted into a hulk in 1904.

SERENA was built in 1881 by Robert Napier & Sons at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2394grt, a length of 320ft, a beam of 40ft 4in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Mendoza she joined the coastal passenger service in 1881 and was converted into a hulk in 1903.

RONACHAN , with a tonnage of 1156grt, was a former sailing purchased from Rankin Gilmour for hulking at Diego Garcia when PSNC began a service to that port in 1881. PSNC acquired a number of coal storage hulks over the years but little if anything is known about these ex-sailing ships.
ARRAN with a tonnage of 962grt, was a former sailing purchased from Rankin Gilmour, with the Ronachan, for hulking at Diego Garcia when PSNC began a service to that port in 1881.

ARICA (2) was built in 1881 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 1771grt, a length of 300ft, a beam of 36ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Built for the coastal service in 1881 she was converted into a hulk during the 1890's.

ECUADOR (3) was built in 1881 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 1768grt, a length of 300ft, a beam of 36ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Built for the Pacific coastal routes she foundered 14 miles off Constitucion in Chile on 4th July 1916.

OSORNO was built in 1881 by Scott & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 532grt, a length of 176ft 2in, a beam of 27ft 1in and a service speed of 11 knots. She entered service on the Valparaiso to South Chilean ports in October 1881 and in November 1899 was sold to the Nicaraguan Government for use as an armed transport.

MORRO (2) was built in 1881 by Scott & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 170grt, a length of 125ft 9in, a beam of 23ft and a service speed of 11 knots. She was built to replace the first Morro for service as the tender at Panama. In 1902 she was sold to J. J. McAuliffe of Valparaiso and was renamed Araucancita in 1906. Three years later her name was changed to Aramac. In 1911 she was sold to Sociedad Lobitos Oilfield Ltda of Callao, a C.T. Bowring subsidiary, without a change of name. She was broken up in 1922.

CORCOVADO (1) was built in 1872 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 3805grt, a length of 387ft 6in, a beam of 43ft in and a service speed of 13 knots. She was built for the Liverpool - South America - Valparaiso service and sailed on her maiden voyage on 19th February 1873. She was sold to Royal Mail Line in 1875, who purchased her to replace the lost Shannon, and renamed her Don. Under the command of Captain Woolward, who remained with the ship for 18 years and 81 round voyages, she commenced her first sailing for Royal Mail on 17th January 1876 from Southampton to the West Indies. She was modernised in 1889 when she was equipped with a triple expansion engine and broken up in 1901.

PUNO (1) was built in 1873 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 3805grt, a length of 387ft 6in, a beam of 43ft 1in and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Corcovado she was built for the Liverpool - South America - Valparaiso service and commenced her maiden voyage on 14th May 1873. In 1875 she was sold to Royal Mail Line as a replacement for their lost Boyne, and renamed Para. She was placed on the Southampton - West Indies service in June 1876 and during the second voyage, on 16th October 1876, an explosion in the after hold tore a large hole in the saloon killing three persons. The hold had been temporarily converted to carry bananas in carbon dioxide at a low temperature. She was refurbished and modernised in 1890 and finally broken up in 1901.

SANTA ROSA was built in 1872 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 1817grt, a length of 308ft, a beam of 38ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. She was built for the Valparaiso - Callao - Panama service. Sold, initially, to Lota Coal Co. in 1890 she was, a few months later, transferred to Cousina Cia of Valparaiso, renamed Luis Cousino and operated by Compania Esplotadora de Lota y Coronel. She was broken up in 1902.

COLOMBIA (1) was built in 1873 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 1823grt, a length of 308ft, a beam of 38ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Santa Rosa she was built for the Valparaiso - Callao - Panama service and sold for breaking up in 1890.

RIMAC was built in 1872 by Evans & Co. at Liverpool with a tonnage of 1805grt, a length of 291ft 9in, a beam of 40ft and a service speed of 11 knots. One of two similar vessels she was built for the services starting at Valparaiso. She was sold to Valparaiso Steamship Co. at Valparaiso with out a change of name and her subsequent career is unrecorded.

ILO was built in 1872 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1794grt, a length of 289ft 8in, a beam of 38ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Similar to the Rimac and costing £47,728 she entered service in January 1872 and was converted into a hulk in 1882.

TRUXILLO was built in 1872 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1449grt, a length of 251ft 4in, a beam of 35ft 7in and a service speed of 11 knots. A side wheel paddle steamer she cost £44,000 and was launched for the Pacific coast service on 14th November 1871, entering service in the following January. Built as a replacement for the Santiago which was lost in 1869 she was converted into a hulk in 1882.

TACORA was built in 1872 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3525grt, a length of 375ft 7in, a beam of 41ft 4in and a service speed of 13 knots. Launched on 23rd May 1872 she cost £103,475 and was equipped with engines built for the Acongagua after it was decided to improve the performance of that vessel with alternative engines. She sailed on her maiden voyage under the command of Capt. C. M. Stewart on 4th October 1872 with the intention of beating the White Star Line's Republic, which was due to sail on the following day, on the Liverpool - Rio de Janeiro - Valparaiso - Callao route. On 28th October the Tacora was wrecked off Cape Santa Maria near Montevideo with the loss of 3 crew members and 10 passengers. Although she came off the rocks she had to be run ashore to avoid sinking.

GALICIA (1) was built in 1873 by Robert Napier & Sons at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3829grt, a length of 383ft 5in, a beam of 43ft and a service speed of 13 knots. Slightly larger than the Tacora she commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 23rd April 1873. In 1898 she was sold to the Canadian Steam Navigation Co. of Liverpool and renamed Gaspasia. She was broken up at Genoa in 1900

VALPARAISO (2) was built in 1873 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3575grt, a length of 379ft 2in, a beam of 41ft 9in and a service speed of 12 knots. Costing £129,850 she was similar to the Tacora and entered the Birkenhead - Valparaiso service on 8th October 1873. On 28th February she was lost at Vigo in Spain.

BAJA was built in 1872 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 74grt, a length of 81ft 2in, and a beam of 16ft. All that is known of her is that she was a tug built for service at Callao..

IBERIA was built in 1873 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4671grt, a length of 433ft 6in, a beam of 45ft and a service speed of 14 knots. She cost £151,600 to built and when launched, on 6th December 1873, was the world's largest ship with the exception of the Great Eastern. Because of strikes which delayed her completion she did not commence her maiden voyage until 21st October 1874. On 12th May 1880 she made her first voyage to Australia for the joint PSNC - Orient Line service and in the following year replaced the Acongagua as a standby ship on the London - Suez - Melbourne - Sydney service. During the Egyptian Arabi Pasha Campaigns in 1882 she was used by the Government for trooping duties. On 25th January 1883 she began to operate a regular service to Australia which continued until 11th June 1890 when she returned to the Liverpool - Valparaiso route. She was fitted with a triple expansion engine in 1893 and, at the same time, had the yards removed from the masts. In 1895 she undertook a positioning voyage to Australia to replace a disabled ship and completed the non-stop voyage via the Cape in 32 days at an average speed of 14 knots. She was broken up at Genoa in 1903.

LIGURIA was built in 1874 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4666grt, a length of 433ft 6in, a beam of 45ft and a service speed of 14 knots. Sister of the Iberia she cost £150,350 to build and made her first sailing from Birkenhead to Valparaiso on 9th September 1874. In 1880 she was one of four vessels transferred to Orient Line management and commenced her first sailing from London - Suez - Melbourne - Sydney on 12th May. She commenced her final voyage to Australia on 9th May 1890 before reverting to the Valparaiso service on 17th September. Like her sister she was equipped with a triple expansion engine and had her yards removed in 1893 and was sold for breaking up at Genoa in 1903.

POTOSI (1) was built in 1873 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4218grt, a length of 421ft 7in, a beam of 43ft 9in and a service speed of 13 knots. During construction she had 25ft added to her length at a cost of £10,000. She was launched for the Birkenhead - Valparaiso service on 14th May 1873 and remained on that run until 1880 when she was transferred to Orient Line management commencing her first voyage to Australia on 7th July of that year. On 26th May 1887 she commenced her final voyage to Australia before reverting to the Valparaiso service and was broken up at Genoa in 1897.

COTOPAXI (1) was built in 1873 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4022grt, a length of 402ft 2in, a beam of 42ft 9in and a service speed of 13 knots. Costing £105,750 she was launched on 15th March 1873 and commenced her maiden voyage on the Birkenhead - Valparaiso service on 18th June. In 1879 she was transferred to Orient Line management for operation on the Australia service. On 14th April 1880 she made her final voyage to Australia before reverting to the Valparaiso service. She collided with the German steamship Olympia on 8th April 1889 in the Straits of Magellan and was beach, careened and repaired in situ. She was refloated on 15th April 1889 but struck another rock and sank. The 202 passengers and crew on board were all rescued by the Setos which was owned by Kosmos Line of Germany.

ILLIMANI was built in 1873 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4022grt, a length of 402ft 2in, a beam of 42ft 9in and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Cotopaxi and costing £106,725 she commenced her maiden voyage on the Birkenhead - Valparaiso service on 26th March 1873. On 18th July 1879 she ran aground and was lost on Mocha Island on the Yemen coast whilst undertaking a voyage on the Australia service.

BRITANNIA was built in 1873 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 4129grt, a length of 411ft 5in, a beam of 32ft 9in and a service speed of 12.75 knots. Costing £140,450 she was launched on 27th May 1873 and commenced her maiden voyage on the 2nd August. On 30th March 1885 the threat of war became imminent when Russian troops crossed the Afghan border and were confronted by British troops. Together with 15 other ships she was taken over as an auxiliary cruiser, requisitioned at Valparaiso on 22nd April and sent to Coquimbo for conversion. Following the Russian withdrawal she was decommissioned at Coquimbo from where she sailed to the UK and resumed commercial service. On 4th September 1895 she grounded whilst leaving Rio de Janeiro, was sold locally for £1000, salvaged, repaired and sold to Camuyrano y Cia of Buenos Aires. In 1900 she was sold to Nogueira, Vives y Cia of Valparaiso and was broken up during the following year at Preston, Lancashire, still as the Britannia.

AYACUCHO was built in 1873 by T Wingate & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1916grt, a length of 311ft 9in, a beam of 38ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. One of three ships built for the coastal service out of Callao she remained in service until 1890 when she was converted into a hulk.

LIMA (2) was built in 1873 by T Wingate & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1804grt, a length of 310ft 7in, a beam of 38ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. Sister of the Ayacucho she was the second of the trio built for the coastal service out of Callao. In 1880 during the war between Peru and Chile she towed a ship full of contraband into Peru. The company was not impressed with this action and the master, Captain Steadman, was dismissed.

BOLIVIA (2) was built in 1874 by T Wingate & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1925grt, a length of 311ft 9in, a beam of 38ft 2in and a service speed of 12 knots. The last of the trio she entered service in 1874 and had an uneventful career until 1895 when she was converted into a hulk.

MAGELLAN (1) was built in 1868 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2856grt, a length of 359ft 7in, a beam of 41ft and a service speed of 13.5 knots. The first of four ships costing £74,550 each she was launched on 30th December 1868 and commenced her maiden voyage on 13th March 1869. Under the command of Capt. C. H. Sivell she commenced the monthly advertised service from Liverpool to Valparaiso. On 29th March 1870 the sailings were increased to twice monthly at a service speed of 12 knots. She continued in service until 1893 when she was broken up in the River Thames.

PATAGONIA was built in 1869 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2866grt, a length of 353ft, a beam of 41ft and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Magellan she commenced her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso on 13th May 1869. In March 1877 she was transferred to the River Plate service and on 4th May 1880 was chartered to the White Star Line for one voyage between Liverpool and New York. On 1st October 1895, during a voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso, she grounded 7 miles north of Tomé at Lingueral without any loss of life.

ARAUCANIA was built in 1869 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2877grt, a length of 354ft 8in, a beam of 41ft and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Magellan she commenced her maiden voyage on 13th July 1896 from Liverpool to Valparaiso. She was transferred to the River Plate service in July 1877 and remained for a further twenty years before being sold to Macbeth & Gray of Liverpool in 1897 and her subsequent career is unrecorded.

CORDILLERA was built in 1869 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 2860grt, a length of 353ft 2in, a beam of 41ft and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Magellan she was launched on 26th June 1869 and commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 13th August. She was transferred to the River Plate service in August 1877. On 20th September 1882 she was lost in the Straits of Magellan.

JOHN ELDER was built in 1869 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3832grt, a length of 381ft 10in, a beam of 41ft 7in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. She was launched on 29th August 1869 with her intended name, Sarmiento, but as John Elder died before completion, the name was changed as a tribute to the man invented the compound engine; an engine which revolutionised maritime transportation. She was PSNC's largest vessel at the time and the first of 11 similar ships. Comparing favourably with the transatlantic liners of the day she was well advanced of other ships but under-powered. On 2nd February 1872,after completing four round voyages, she returned to the shipyard where she was rebuilt at a cost of £17,000. Her length was increased to 406ft 5in and new boilers and a second funnel were installed. In 1877 she was placed on the joint Orient - PSNC service to Australia and after the mizzen mast was removed commenced her first sailing on 19th April 1877 from Adelaide to Liverpool via the Suez Canal. She reverted to the Liverpool to Valparaiso service on 3rd November 1886. On 17th January 1892 during a voyage from Valparaiso to Talcuhuanco with 139 passenger she stranded on Cape Carranza Rocks in fog without any loss of life.

John Elder, 1869

ATACAMA was built in 1870 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1821grt, a length of 290ft, a beam of 38ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. One of a class of four ships she was built for the Chilean coastal service and was wrecked in 1877.

COQUIMBO was built in 1871 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1821grt, a length of 290ft 7in, a beam of 38ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Atacama she was built for the South American coastal service at a cost of £42,495 and launched 7th December 1869. After twenty one years service she was hulked in 1901.

VALDIVIA (2) was built in 1870 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1821grt, a length of 287ft, a beam of 38ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Atacama she was built for the South American Pacific coastal services. In 1882 she was wrecked off Huacho with the loss of 1 life.

ETEN was built in 1871 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 1853grt, a length of 292ft, a beam of 38ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. Sister of the Atacama she was built for the South American Pacific coastal services. In 1877 she was wrecked of Ventura Point with the loss of 120 lives. The cause of the accident was put down to a change of current following an earthquake.

AREQUIPA (1) was built in 1870 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1065grt, a length of 231ft 9in, a beam of 35ft 2in and a service speed of 11 knots. A side wheel paddle steamer she was ordered as the Casma and built for the South American services at a cost of £38,750. She was hulked in 1883 and sold in 1887.

HUACHO was built in 1870 by Thos. Royden & Sons at Liverpool with a tonnage of 329grt, a length of 149ft 5in, a beam of 25ft 6in and a service speed of 9 knots. One of a pair she was built for the Callao - Arica - Iquique service on the Peruvian coast. In 1882 she was sold to the Governor of Ecuador and in 1894 the registers showed her as being owned by M. J. Kelly of Guayaquil. She was finally deleted from the Register in 1914.

IQUIQUE was built in 1871 by Thos. Royden & Sons at Liverpool with a tonnage of 323grt, a length of 149ft 5in, a beam of 25ft 6in and a service speed of 9 knots. Sister of the Huacho and costing £9,350 she was built for the Peruvian coastal service and based at Callao. She was wrecked in 1877.

CHIMBORAZO was built in 1871 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3847grt, a length of 384ft, a beam of 41ft 4in and a service speed of 13 knots. At a cost of £91,010 she was built for the Liverpool to Valparaiso service, was launched on 21st June 1871 and commenced her maiden voyage on the following 13th October. This class of ship undertook the voyage to Callao in 56.5 days calling at nine ports. Steaming time was 40.5 days at an average speed of 11.4 knots with a coal consumption of 47 tons per day. In 1877 she was chartered to Anderson & Anderson for the Orient - Pacific service and in the following year was purchased by the Orient Steam Navigation Co. without a change of name. On 12th May 1887 she commenced her final voyage from London to Sydney via the Suez Canal and in 1889 was cruising to the Norwegian Fjords. She was sold to P. J. Pitcher of Liverpool in 1894 and renamed Cleopatra for use a a cruise ship by the Polytechnic Touring Association. By 1895 she was owned by the Ocean Cruising & Yachting Co. of London and was broken up at Preston, Lancashire in 1897.

CUZCO (1) was built in 1871 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3898grt, a length of 384ft, a beam of 41ft 4in and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Chimborazo she cost £90,990 and was built for the Liverpool to Valparaiso service commencing her maiden voyage on 13th January 1872. In 1877 she was chartered to Anderson & Anderson for the Orient - Pacific Line and commenced her first voyage from London to Sydney via the Suez Canal on 29th September. The passage time to Adelaide took 40 days 12 hours which was a record. In the following year she was sold to the Orient Steam Navigation Co. without a change of name. In 1888 she was fitted with a triple expansion engine by her builder who had now become the Fairfield Ship Building Co. She was broken up at Genoa in 1905.

GARONNE was built in 1871 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 3871grt, a length of 382ft 1in, a beam of 41ft 4in and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Chimborazo she commenced her maiden voyage on the Liverpool to Valparaiso on 29th June 1871. In June 1877 she was sold to the Orient Pacific Line for service to Australia via the Cape and commenced her first sailing to Australia on 17th April 1878. On 6th July 1889 she made her last voyage to Australia before operating as a cruise ship. She was sold to F. Waterhouse of Seattle in 1897 for use during Alaska gold rush and two years later was used by the U. S. Government for trooping during the Spanish - American war. In 1905 she was broken up at Genoa.

LUSITANIA was built in 1871 by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead with a tonnage of 3825grt, a length of 384ft, a beam of 41ft 4in and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Chimborazo she was built at a cost of £91,852 and commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 29th September 1871. A few hours into her return voyage she shed three of her four propeller blades. There wasn't a dock big enough to take her at Valparaiso and it wasn't feasible to beach the ship for repairs. Consequently a wooden caisson 24ft x 26ft was built around the stern and when pumped dry the spare propeller was fitted. In February 1877 she was chartered to Orient Line for the Australia service and on 28th June was sold to the Orient Pacific Line. She completed her first voyage from Plymouth to Melbourne via the Cape of Good Hope in 40 days 6 hours at an average speed of 13 knots beating the previous record by 10 days. He return voyage through the Suez Canal took 41 days. In 1878 she came under the ownership of Orient Line and in 1886 was fitted with a triple expansion engine. On 31st March 1900 she was acquired by Elder Dempster's Beaver Line for their Liverpool - Halifax - St John (New Brunswick) service. In July of the same year she returned to PSNC for six months before returning to Elder Dempster in February 1901 and chartered to Allan Line. On 26th June 1901 she was wrecked on Cape Race during the charter which was only for the summer months.

ACONGAGUA was built in 1872 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4105grt, a length of 404ft 9in, a beam of 41ft 5in and a service speed of 13 knots. Sister of the Chimborazo she was lengthened during construction at a cost of £5,685. Costing £90,970 she was virtually a single funnelled version of the rebuilt John Elder and commenced her maiden voyage to Valparaiso on 28th September 1872. In 1878 she was used by the Orient-Pacific Line as a standby vessel and made her first sailing to Australia via the Cape in 1880. On 24th October 1883 she returned to the Liverpool - Valparaiso service where she remained until 1895 when she was sold to Verdeau et Cie of Bordeaux and renamed Egypte for their Levant routes. She was scrapped in 1896.

SANTIAGO (3) was built in 1871 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1451grt, a length of 251ft 7in, a beam of 35ft 6in and a service speed of 11 knots. A side wheel paddle steamer she was built at a cost of £44,000 for the west coast of South America services. She was sold in 1882 and her subsequent career is unknown.

TABOGUILLA was built in 1871 by Bowdler Chaffer & Co. at Liverpool with a tonnage of 154grt, a length of 115ft 4in, a beam of 21ft 1in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was built as a tender based at Callao and was disposed of in 1893.

SORATA (1) was built in 1872 by John Elder & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 4014grt, a length of 401ft 4in, a beam of 42ft 9in and a service speed of 12.5 knots. At a cost of £106,725 she was launched three months late on 2nd October 1872 and on 8th January 1872 commenced her maiden voyage, inaugurating the weekly Liverpool - Bordeaux - Vigo - Lisbon - Rio de Janeiro Sandy Point - Valparaiso - Callao service. She was transferred to Orient Line management in 1879 and on 13th February 1880 made her first voyage for them from London to Australia via Cape Town. After completing her last voyage for Orient Line on 29th April 1886 she reverted back to PSNC and sailed on the Liverpool - Valparaiso service on 22nd September 1886. She was broken up at Tranmere in Cheshire during 1895.

GUAYAQUIL was built in 1860 at Renfrew with a tonnage of 661grt, a length of 208ft 8in, a beam of 30ft 2in and a service speed of 9 knots. Sister of the San Carlos she was built for the Callao - Guayaquil - Panama service where she remained until 1870 when she was sold locally for use on a Callao - Galapagos Island service. She was broken up at Callao in 1880.

MORRO (1) was built in 1860 at Glasgow with a tonnage of 132grt, a length of 119ft 7in, and a beam of 20ft 1in. A simple side wheel paddle steamer she was the company's first ship to be built with a steel hull as a passenger tender based at Panama. She was replaced by the Morro (2) in 1881 and her subsequent career is unknown.

PERUANO was built in 1860 at New York with a tonnage of 639grt, a length of 181ft 6in, and a beam of 29ft 6in. A side wheel paddle steamer she was based at Guayaquil until she was sold in 1874 to Schuber & Co. of Guayaquil. Ten years later her engine was removed and she was converted into a hulk and was possibly used as a warehouse and office.

PERU (2) was built in 1861 by John Reid & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1307grt, a length of 260ft 5in, a beam of 32ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. A side wheel paddle steamer she commenced her maiden voyage on 1st January 1862 from Liverpool to Valparaiso, where she was based, via St. Vincent in the West Indies and Rio de Janeiro. As the American Civil War was in progress she carried three cannon manned by Royal Naval gun crews. Converted to a hulk in 1881 she was supposedly wrecked near Layerto in 1863 but remained in Lloyds Register until 1879/80.

CHILE (2) was built in 1863 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1672grt, a length of 274ft 10in, a beam of 36ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. Built to a similar specification as the Peru at a cost pf £53,650 she was delivered to Valparaiso. In 1878 she was sold to the Chilean Government without a change of name and was removed from the registry in 1883.

TALCA (1) was built in 1862 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 708grt, a length of 194ft 1in, a beam of 30ft 1in and a service speed of 10 knots. A side wheel paddle steamer she was the first PSNC ship to be built with a straight stem as opposed to the clipper bow and entered service on the Chilean coast. In 1865, whilst under the command of Capt. George Chambers, she was requisitioned by President Moreno of Ecuador to quell a local rebellion. When the Talca arrived on the scene flying several battle ensigns the rebels fled and the ship continued on her voyage as if nothing had happened. Her engines were removed in 1874 prior to being converted into a hulk and in 1880 she was taken out to sea and scuttled.

QUITO (2) was built in 1863 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1388grt, a length of 271ft, a beam of 32ft 10in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. A side wheel paddle steamer she was designed by Thomas Smith and built at a cost of £48,750. She was the first of several classes of ship built for the coastal passenger trade and carried deck and cabin passengers as well as deck cargo which could include cattle. Because of a bowsprit and in order to make a hasty departure should the fierce westerly winds threaten, they tended to berth stern first at most ports. She commenced her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso on 27th January 1864 and was sold in the following year. Her subsequent career is not recorded.

PAYTA was built in 1864 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1344grt, a length of 263ft 8in, a beam of 38ft 5in and a service speed of 13.5 knots. Sister of the Quito she entered service on the Pacific coast of South America in 1864 and was sold to the Chilean Government in 1878.

ECUADOR (2) was built in Glasgow during 1864 with a tonnage of 500grt and propelled with a single screw. No other career details are available except that she was lost in 1870.

PACIFIC was built in 1865 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1631grt, a length of 267ft 5in, a beam of 40ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Launched on 28th January 1865 she was delivered in the April and sailed to South America where she operated on the Pacific coast routes. The first of a class of four ships she was , with her sisters, placed temporarily on the Trans - South Atlantic in 1868 and became the only compound engined paddle steamers to be deployed on a transatlantic service. On 13th May 1868 she inaugurated the South America to UK service from Valparaison to Liverpool with calls at Sandy Point (Argentina), Montevideo, Re de Janeiro, St Vincent, Lisbon and St Nazaire. On the first departure under the command of Captain George Conlan she carried 170 passengers and gold and bullion valued at £65,000. The passage time was 43 days. She was eventually hulked in 1880.

SANTIAGO (2) was built in 1865 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1619grt, a length of 267ft 5in, a beam of 40ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Pacific she was launched on 27th May 1865 for service on the South American Pacific coast service. On 13th January 1869 she sailed from Valparaiso with 172 passengers and eight days later entered the Straits of Magellan and anchored off Mercy Harbour to await better weather conditions. On 23rd January she weighed anchor and after sailing for some 2.5 miles was wrecked on an uncharted rock with the loss of 2 seamen and a child.

LIMENA was built in 1865 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1622grt, a length of 267ft 5in, a beam of 40ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Pacific she was built at a cost of £59,000 for the Pacific coast of South America service. In 1868 she was transferred to the Valparaiso to Liverpool service and in 1880 was converted to a hulk at Callao.

PANAMA (2) was built in 1866 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1642grt, a length of 267ft 5in, a beam of 40ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. The last of the quartet, she was delivered for the Pacific coast service in 1866. Two years later she was transferred temporarily to the Valparaiso - Liverpool route to supplement the Pacific. In 1869 she was replaced by the Magellan class of vessel and was converted into a hulk in 1870.

FAVORITA was built in 1865 in New York with a tonnage of 837grt, a length of 197ft 1in, a beam of 30ft 4in and a service speed of 9 knots. Built as a U. S. style riverboat for calm coastal water work she was PSNC's last wooden ship. In February 1871 she caught fire and was gutted in Callao Bay.

COLON was built in 1861 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1995grt, a length of 286ft 1in, a beam of 39ft and a service speed of 8 knots. Built in 1861 she was not acquired by PSNC until 1866 to replace the lost Cloda. She was sold in 1872 at Valparaiso and her subsequent career is unknown.

ARICA (1) was built in 1867 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 740grt, a length of 204ft, a beam of 30ft and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built for the South coast of South America service. On 13th January 1869 during a voyage from Lambayeque to Callao she stranded off Pacsmayo Point in Peru whilst entering port because the lighthouse was not operating.

QUITO (3) was built in 1867 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 743grt, a length of 204ft, a beam of 30ft and a service speed of 10 knots. Sister of the Arica she operated a similar service. In 1882 she was converted into a coal hulk at Arica.

SUPE was built in 1867 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 298grt, a length of 145ft 7in, and a beam of 25ft 1in. Costing £7,500 she entered service in 1867 as, in PSNC's terminology, a 'pig launch'. She was sold in 1882 at Puerto Montt and her subsequent career is unrecorded.

ATLAS was built in 1867 at Paisley in Scotland with a tonnage of 56grt, a length of 70ft 2in, a beam of 17ft 4in and a service speed of 9 knots. Built as a tug for service at Valparaiso she was towed there by the Supe. In 1890 she ran ashore and became a derelict.

CALDERA was built in 1868 by Wm. Denny & Bros. at Dumbarton with a tonnage of 1741grt, a length of 282ft 2in, a beam of 34ft 4in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was launched on 28th June 1868 as the Assam as a speculative build for P & O who did not want her and remained at the yard until 1870 when Denny's undertook their first compound conversion which increased her speed to 11 knots. Purchased by PSNC for £37,000 in August 1870 she was not a success and was subsequently sold to J. Laird Jrn. in 1876. She was lengthened to 333ft 6in, given a straight stem and had new compound engines installed. In 1879 she was sold to Compagnie Général Transatlantique without a change of name and deployed on their Marseilles to New York service. She was sold to F. Stumore & Co. of London in 1886 and in May 1887 was abandoned at sea off Suakin, Sudan.

ELIZABETH was a 445 ton sailing ship built at Bristol in 1832 for Miles & Co. She was acquired by PSNC in January 1840 to transport coal to Valparaiso where she was to be converted into a coal hulk. However, the crew deemed here unseaworthy for a voyage round Cape Horn and she was subsequently sold in the February.

PORTSEA was a 451 ton sailing barque built at Calcutta in 1808 for the London - Calcutta trade. She was acquired by PSNC in February 1840 as a replacement for the Elizabeth. After completing the voyage to Valparaiso she had her topmasts and yards removed and was used as a coal hulk. Her subsequent disposal is not recorded.

CECILIA was a 325 ton sailing barque built at Dunbar in 1815 for Alexander & Co. of Glasgow for their Clyde - Australia service. She was acquired by PSNC in 1841 for a voyage to Valparaiso where her topmasts and yards were removed prior to being used as a coal hulk. Her subsequent disposal is not recorded.

JASPER, of which no details are known, sailed to Valparaiso with a cargo of coal and was converted into a coal hulk at one of the South American stations. Details of her disposal are not known.

CHILE (1) was built in 1840 by Curling & Young at Limehouse, London with a tonnage of 682grt, a length of 198ft, a beam of 29ft and a service speed of 8 knots. Launched on 18th April 1840 at a cost of £11935 she was a paddle steamer with sails on two masts. The funnel was hinged so that when she was under sail only it could be stowed in the horizontal position on chocks. She had accommodation for 116 passengers and 64 crew members. Under the command of Capt. Glover she commenced her maiden voyage on 24th June 1840 from Gravesend to Valparaiso via Falmouth, Rio de Janeiro, and the Straits of Magellan. When she arrived at Point Famine she rendezvoused with her sister, the Peru, so that they could sail into Valparaiso at the same time on 16th October. In 1841 she struck a reef and had to return to Valparaiso in a sinking condition where she was repaired and returned to service with the funnel forward of the paddle boxes. She was replaced by the Santiago in 1852 and sold to the Chilean Government. Her subsequent history is unknown.

PERU (1) was built in 1840 by Curling & Young at Limehouse, London with a tonnage of 690grt, a length of 198ft, a beam of 29ft and a service speed of 8 knots. Sister of the Chile she commenced her maiden voyage under the command of Capt. George Peacock on 10th July 1840 from Gravesend to Valparaiso via Falmouth and the Straits of Magellan. She then made the first coastal sailing between Valparaiso and Callao which took eight days. She was due to be sold in 1852 after being replaced by the Lima but before that could happen she stranded and was lost.
BOLIVIA (1) was built in 1849 by Robert Napier at Govan, Glasgow with a tonnage of 773grt, a length of 197ft 6in, a beam of 26ft and a service speed of 8 knots. Similar to the Chile she commenced her maiden voyage under command of Capt. Brown on 23rd October 1849 from Liverpool to Valparaiso via Madeira and Rio de Janeiro. On arrival she was deployed on the Valparaiso - Antofagasta - Callao service. She was reduced to a coal hulk at Valparaiso in 1870 and nine years later was towed out to sea and scuttled.

ECUADOR (1) was built in 1845 by Tod & MacGregor at Glasgow with a tonnage of 323grt, a length of 120ft 8in, a beam of 21ft 6in and a service speed of 8 knots. A simple side wheel paddle steamer she was the company's first iron hulled ship and commenced her maiden voyage in January 1846 under the command of Capt. N. Glover from Liverpool to Callao via Valparaiso. She was then deployed on the Callao - Guayaquil - Panama coastal service which linked with Royal Mail's Panama overland route. In 1850 she was deemed too small for the service and was sold to Pacific Mail Steamship Corp. of America. After three further years service she was wrecked at Coquimbo.
NEW GRANADA (1) was built in 1846 by Smith & Rodgers at Glasgow with a tonnage of 694grt, a length of 177ft 5in, a beam of 24ft 7in and a service speed of 8 knots. A schooner rigged side wheel paddle steamer she commenced her maiden voyage in August 1846 under the command of Capt. John Williams from Liverpool to Callao via Madeira, Rio de Janeiro and Valparaiso. She was placed with the Ecuador on the Callao - Guayaquil - Panama service. She was disposed of in 1850 but details of the sale and subsequent history are not recorded. As a point of interest, New Granada was the former name of the Republic of Colombia.

SANTIAGO (1) was built in 1851 by Robert Napier at Govan, Glasgow with a tonnage of 961grt, a length of 246ft 4in, a beam of 28ft and a service speed of 10 knots. The first of four paddle steamers, which together cost £140,000, were built to replace the Chile, the Peru, the Ecuador and the New Granada. She was delivered for the Liverpool - Valparaiso service under the command of Captain Hind. In 1857 she was sold to the Peruvian Government and converted, initially, into a frigate and then a non-seagoing training ship.

LIMA (1) was built in 1851 by Robert Napier at Govan, Glasgow with a tonnage of 1461grt, a length of 249ft 6in, a beam of 29ft 2in and a service speed of 10 knots. She commenced her maiden voyage on 2nd October 1851 and completed the voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso at an average speed of 9.75 knots consuming 2 tons of coal per hour. In 1852 she was fired upon by shore batteries when she called to deliver the mails at Guayaquil. She was the company's first ship to return to Liverpool in 1854 where she was lengthened and a compound engine installed. This gave her a new speed of 10.5 knots on 1 ton of coal per hour. On 11th July 1863 she was wrecked off Lagartija Island in Southern Chile.

QUITO (1) was built in 1852 by Robert Napier at Govan, Glasgow with a tonnage of 1461grt, a length of 248ft 8in, a beam of 28ft and a service speed of 10 knots. a slightly larger sister of the Santiago she commenced her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso on 25th January 1852. In August of the following year during a voyage from Panama to Valparaiso she was lost on a reef 12 miles from Huasco..

BOGOTA (1) was built in 1852 by Robert Napier at Govan, Glasgow with a tonnage of 1461grt, a length of 248ft 8in, a beam of 28ft and a service speed of 10 knots. The last of the quartet she commenced her maiden voyage on 25th February 1852 from Liverpool to Valparaiso and in 1856 returned to Liverpool where she was equipped with a compound engine. In 1871 she struck a reef off Tarada Point but was salvaged and reduced to a coal hulk. Seven years later, in 1878, she was towed out to sea and scuttled.

LA PERLITA was built in 1853 by Bank Quay Foundry Co. at Warrington with a tonnage of 140grt, a length of 106ft, a beam of 17ft 5in and a service speed of 9 knots. A simple side wheel paddle steamer she was built for the Buenaventura (Colombia - Panama service but on 17th June she left Liverpool on her delivery voyage under the command of Capt. Maughan and disappeared without trace. The journey, via the Straits of Magellan, was over 11,000 miles and an incredible undertaking for a vessel so small.

OSPREY was built in 1852 at Glasgow with a tonnage of 609grt, a length of 169ft 7in, a beam of 18ft 6in and a service speed of 9 knots. A simple side wheel paddle steamer she was built as the Osprey for the City of Cork Steam Ship Co. She was acquired in the following year for the Callao - Pisco - Huacho service but was lost during the voyage out to Peru.

VALDIVIA (1) was built in 1853 by Caird & Co. at Cartsdyke, Greenock with a tonnage of 573grt, a length of 128ft 6in, a beam of 21ft 2in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was the company's first screw propelled ship and the only one with a wooden hull. The intention was to use her as a coastal feeder ship but she proved to be too small. She completed her delivery voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso in 1853 and four years later she stranded and was lost near Valparaiso.

PANAMA (1) was built in 1854 by John Reid & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 270grt, a length of 128ft 6in, a beam of 21ft 2in and a service speed of 9 knots. Iron hulled, she was built as a replacement for the La Perlita but after commencing her maiden voyage from Liverpool in April 1854 she struck a rock and sank near Point Tamar.

INCA (1) was built in 1856 by Caird & Co. at Cartsdyke, Greenock with a tonnage of 290grt, a length of 130ft 8in, a beam of 20ft 9in and a service speed of 9 knots. Sister of the Valdivia she was , with the Valparaiso, the first ship to be fitted with the compound inverted engine. In 1852 John Elder went into partnership with Charles Randolph as Randolph & Elder. On 24th January 1853 they secured the patent for the vertical direct acting compound engine. A high pressure cylinder and a low pressure cylinder moved in opposite directions to drive two diametrically opposed crankshafts. The compound engine reduced coal consumption by 30% and the first ship to be fitted with such an engine was the Brandon. On 15th March 1856 Randolf & Elder took out a patent for an improved compound engine in the form of a "V" which saved space and which was described as compound inverted. In 1858 the two partners acquired the old yard of James Napier & Hoey and added shipbuilding to their activities. Charles Randolf retired in 1868 and the company became John Elder & Co., a name which, in 1885, was changed to Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. Ltd. The Inca was delivered in 1856 for deployment on the Callao to Chala mail service. She was sold in 1874, renamed Union and later in the same year was wrecked at Puerto Bueno in Chile.

VALPARAISO (1) was built in 1856 by Randolph & Elder at Glasgow with a tonnage of 1060grt, a length of 234ft 1in, a beam of 29ft 1in and a service speed of 13 knots. On completion she sailed from Liverpool to Valparaiso where she was deployed on the Valparaiso - Chileo service with nine ports of call. On 20th February 1871 she was wrecked on Lagartiga Island, Chile during a voyage from Calbuco to Ancud. Although known about locally the wreck wasn't identified and some relics removed until 1976.

CALLAO (1) was built in 1858 by John Reid & Co. at Glasgow with a tonnage of 700grt, a length of 235ft, a beam of 29ft and a service speed of 13 knots. Similar to the Valparaiso she was built for the Valparaiso - Pacific ports - Panama service and remained there until she was converted into a coal hulk at Valparaiso.

CLODA was built in 1857 at Glasgow with a tonnage of 699grt, a length of 214ft 5in, a beam of 30ft 5in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was built for an Irish company, supposedly by Randolph & Elder although, at the time, all newbuildings were compounded at John Elder's yard. Purchased by PSNC in 1858 for the South American Pacific Coast services she remained with the company until 25th January 1865 when she was lost off Huacho in Peru without any loss of life.

PRINCE OF WALES was built in 1854 by W Simons & Co. at Whiteinch with a tonnage of 700grt, a length of 195ft 5in, a beam of 26ft 4in and a service speed of 10 knots. She was built as the Prince of Wales with a funnel, red with a black top, whose rake great than that of the masts, but not acquired by PSNC until 1858 to replace the Valdivia. In the following year she was wrecked on the coast of Chile.

ANNE was built in 1854 by Chas Rennoldson at South Shields with a tonnage of 344grt, a length of 153ft 4in, a beam of 22ft and a service speed of 9 knots. She was built for the South American Mining Co. of London for trading between Valparaiso and Puerto Montt. Acquired by PSNC in 1859 to replace the Prince of Wales she was deemed too small and sold in 1864. Her career thereafter is unknown.

SAN CARLOS was built in 1860 at Renfrew with a tonnage of 652grt, a length of 199ft 9in, a beam of 30ft 2in and a service speed of 9 knots. She was built for the Callao - Guayaquil - Panama service and sold in 1874 to unspecified buyers.

PANAMA the record in the Sydney Morning Herald for October 19 1863 (p. 4) describes
the ship as the 414 ton barque, Capt. Habig arrived from San Franciso.
The vessel cleared for Melbourne where it took aboard sheep and horses
for Otago. It sailed from Melbourne on December 21 1863. After that I
have no way of tracking the voyage.